Use Bag Balm For Skin Problems Of All Sorts

I first bought Bag Balm for red and swollen eyelids that nothing else seemed to help. I don’t know if the problem was an allergy or something caused from eye strain and rubbing, but nothing was helping. I’m not even sure you’re supposed to use Bag Balm around your eyes, but I did and it worked.

And it’s certainly cheap enough.

Since then, I’ve discovered many other uses for Bag Balm. This includes as a substitute for lip balm, on small patches of scaly skin and as a treatment for minor burns that don’t break the skin instead. This makes more sense than wasting antibiotic ointment.

Bag Balm was, of course, developed for use on animals, and if you visit any stock show or animal barn, you’ll see containers of this everywhere. In fact, the whole place usually has the distinctive Bag Balm smell.

That’s probably why so many people think Bag Balm smells like animals. Actually, many tamed and clipped animals smell like Bag Balm. Owners use the stuff to keep udders soft, to eliminate razor burn caused by close clipping and to heal minor cuts, scrapes and other skin problems.

I can’t say enough good things about Bag Balm because it’s worked on everything I’ve tried it on. It works as a skin protectant like Vaseline, but it has a lighter feel and rubs in better to actually do some good healing your skin ailments — and those of your pets.

If you have skin problems that nothing else seems to work for, trying Bag Balm might be a sensible idea. The container doesn’t offer any real advice for what you should use it on and what you shouldn’t, so you’re pretty much on your own. Simply use it prudently and you should be fine. You can contact the company if you have specific questions, and it’s never a good idea to use something like this on a large area of broken skin or a deep cut.

Give it a try, and see if you like economical and effective Bag Balm as much as I do.